Don’t You Take Anything That Big Pharma Isn’t Making Money On. Next they will be putting people into jail for using homeopathic medications.



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FDA Is Taking a More Aggressive Stance Toward Homeopathic Drugs
https://www.sciencealert.com/fda-takes-more-aggressive-stance-toward-homeopathic-drugs?perpetual=yes&limitstart=1

“Just silly from a scientific point of view.”
LAURIE MCGINLEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
19 DEC 2017

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Monday proposed a tougher enforcement policy toward homeopathic drugs, saying it would target products posing the greatest safety risks, including those containing potentially harmful ingredients or being marketed for cancer, heart disease and opioid and alcohol addictions.

Homeopathy is based on an 18th-century idea that substances that cause disease symptoms can, in very small doses, cure the same symptoms.

Modern medicine, backed up by numerous studies, has disproved the central tenets of homeopathy and shown that the products are worthless at best and harmful at worst.

Under US law, homeopathic drugs are required to meet the same approval rules as other drugs. But under a policy adopted in 1988, the agency has used “enforcement discretion” to allow the items to be manufactured and distributed without FDA approval.

Agency officials don’t plan to begin requiring that homeopathic products get approval – officials say that would be impractical – but they are signalling stepped-up scrutiny for items deemed a possible health threat.

Examples of high-risk products include ones that are administered by injection, are intended for vulnerable populations like children or the elderly, or are marketed for serious diseases, the agency said.

The FDA’s proposed approach, outlined in a draft guidance that will be open for public for 90 days, comes more than a year after homeopathic teething tablets and gels containing belladonna were linked to 400 injuries and the deaths of 10 children.

An FDA lab analysis later confirmed that some of the products “contained elevated and inconsistent levels of belladonna”, a toxic substance, the agency said.

Once a niche field, homeopathy has grown into to a US$3 billion industry that peddles treatments for everything from cancer to colds, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb noted in a statement.

“In many cases, people may be placing their trust and money in therapies that may bring little or no benefit in combating serious ailments, or worse – that may cause significant and even irreparable harm” because of poor manufacturing quality or unsafe ingredients, he said.

Still, he said, the agency wants to balance its safety concerns with the desires of consumers who want to continue using the products.

Under its planned approach, many products won’t be considered high risk and will remain available to consumers, Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, told reporters during a teleconference.

But she said, the agency would “go after” products that cause – or might cause – “overt harm”.

The National Center for Homeopathy, which advocates for homeopathy and is based in Mount Laurel, NJ, says on its website that “homeopathy is a safe, gentle, and natural system of healing that works with your body to relieve symptoms, restore itself, and improve your overall health.”

Steven Salzberg, a biomedical engineer at Johns Hopkins University who in the past has criticised the FDA for not taking action against homeopathy, said it was “terrific” that the agency now plans to try to rein in the industry.

He cautioned that product makers are likely to “hit back hard with lots of spurious claims in an effort to confuse consumers and to protect their profits.”

Salzberg added that homeopathic products’ packaging suggests that the items “cure all sorts of conditions – pain, colds, asthma, indigestion, arthritis, you name it – and yet there’s not a whit of evidence” that they cure anything.

The homeopathy field, he said, is “just silly from a scientific point of view, more like a religious belief than a scientific belief.”

In July, Britain’s National Health System announced plans to stop doctors from prescribing homeopathic drugs. Simon Stevens, the system’s chief executive, described homeopathy as “at best a placebo and a misuse of scarce NHS funds”.

The move came years after the House of Commons called on the government health service to stop paying for homeopathic prescriptions, saying, “To maintain patient trust, choice and safety, the Government should not endorse the use of placebo treatments, including homeopathy.”

In April 2015, the FDA held public hearings on the way it regulates homeopathic products as part of an effort to get public input on its enforcement polices.

The agency said Monday that as a result of the hearing and 9,000 comments submitted by the public, the FDA had decided to propose a new “comprehensive, risk-based enforcement approach to drug products labelled as homeopathic and marketed without FDA approval.”

Over the past several years, the FDA has issued warnings about other homeopathic drug products, including zinc-containing intranasal products that may cause a loss of sense of smell; certain homeopathic asthma products that have not been effective in treating asthma and other products that contain strychnine, a poison used to kill rodents.

2017 © The Washington Post

This article was originally published by The Washington Post.

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From Health Ranger: Spying Toys


Consumer watchdogs say popular toys are secretly spying on your children

Image: Consumer watchdogs say popular toys are secretly spying on your children

(NaturalNews) The Information and Technology Age is exciting for all the helpful changes it has delivered to consumers to make our lives much easier. But with it has come something terrible: The loss of privacy and the ability for Big Brother to keep an eye on all of us 24/7/365—and often in sinister ways.

Consumer watchdog groups say that increasingly sophisticated children’s toys come with the dual ability to spy on families, in essence. As CNN reports, there are a number of children’s dolls that have such capability.

The groups say that two items manufactured by Genesis Toys record conversations, further claiming that the recordings then are uploaded to Nuance Communications, a voice technology company that has as some of its clients the U.S. military, intelligence agencies and law enforcement.

The consumer watchdogs—the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC); the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood; the Center for Digital Democracy; and the Consumers Union—have filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission in reference to two toys, the My Friend Cayla doll and the i-Que robot. The groups say that the “toys subject young children to ongoing surveillance” while violating privacy and consumer protection statutes.

The complaint adds: “Both Genesis Toys and Nuance Communications unfairly and deceptively collect, use, and disclose audio files of children’s voices without providing adequate notice or obtaining verified parental consent.”

The potential for such devices to be misused is huge

CNN reported further that the two toys are connected to the Internet and allow children to talk to and interact with them. When a child asks one of the toys a question, his or her words are recorded and then converted into text so that answers can be obtained from Google, Wikipedia and Weather Underground. Then those voice recordings are summarily uploaded to Nuance, which is a voice recognition technology.

EPIC and the other consumer groups also state that Nuance then uses the recordings it surreptitiously obtains in order to improve products that it then sells to the Pentagon, the U.S. government and law enforcement agencies. One specific product—Nuance Identifier—works like voice recognition, helping security and intelligence officials search a database of millions of recordings so they can identify criminals by their voices.

The company’s VP of corporate marketing and communications, Richard Mack, told CNN that his firm does not use or sell the voice data collected for any marketing or advertising purposes—as if that is what matters most to unsuspecting parents.

He added that he had not yet received any inquiry from the FTC but that the company would cooperate and respond should that happen.

Toys certainly are not the only products being connected to the “Internet of things” that have privacy advocates worried.

24/7 privacy abuse

As Natural News has reported, consumer groups have also expressed concern over devices like Amazon’s “Echo,” which again is always online and is always listening for the sound of the owner’s voice. Like the dolls, Echo also uses voice recognition to invade privacy, and EPIC, among others, has also been opposed to the devices because they can be so readily misused.

“We are on the trajectory of a future filled with voice-assisted apps and voice-assisted devices,” Forrester Research analyst Fatemeh Khatibloo told the AP. “This is going to require finding the fine balance between creating a really great user experience and something that’s creepy.”

Such devices—toys, ‘household products’ like Echo, and even our “Internet of Things” appliances—can all be secretly tasked by spy agencies, law enforcement or just hackers in order to eavesdrop on our conversations. Besides a blatant violation of the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment privacy protections, our inner most thoughts, secrets, passwords and other closely-held information will be at constant risk of being exposed and/or stolen.

And in the case of the two dolls, that would include abusing the privacy of our children.

Sources:

CNN.com

NaturalNews.com

BREAKING: GA, KY, WV Confirm They Suspect Obama’s DHS Hacked Their Election Networks


BREAKING: GA, KY, WV Confirm They Suspect Obama’s DHS Hacked Their Election Networks [VIDEO]

http://100percentfedup.com/breaking-ga-ky-wv-confirm-they-suspect-obamas-dhs-hacked-their-election-networks-video/
BUT…BUT…BUT…THE RUSSIANS?
This is pretty scary stuff. A federal government agency run by an Obama crony attempting to penetrate the firewall of a State agency tasked with overseeing the elections? What conceivable reason could Obama’s DHS have for hacking the Georgia Sec of State’s office after the election?

Georgia’s secretary of state has claimed the Department of Homeland Security tried to breach his office’s firewall and has issued a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson asking for an explanation.

Brian Kemp issued a letter to Johnson on Thursday after the state’s third-party cybersecurity provider detected an IP address from the agency’s Southwest D.C. office trying to penetrate the state’s firewall. According to the letter, the attempt was unsuccessful.

And now, Channel 2 Investigative Reporter Aaron Diamond has learned two more states’ election agencies have confirmed suspected cyberattacks linked to the same U.S. Department of Homeland Security IP address as last month’s massive attack in Georgia.

http://up.anv.bz/latest/anvload.html?key=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

The two states reporting the suspected cyberattacks were West Virginia and Kentucky.

“We need somebody to dig down into this story and figure out exactly what happened,” said Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.

2-more-states-dhs-election-hacks

In the past week, the Georgia Secretary of State’s Office has confirmed 10 separate cyberattacks on its network over the past 10 months that were traced back to DHS addresses.

“We’re being told something that they think they have it figured out, yet nobody’s really showed us how this happened,” Kemp said. “We need to know.”

He says the new information from the two other states presents even more reason to be concerned.

“So now this just raises more questions that haven’t been answered about this and continues to raise the alarms and concern that I have,” Kemp said.

Through an open-records request, Diamant acquired the results of a survey Kemp asked the National Association of Secretaries of State to send to its members.

West Virginia wrote back, “This IP address did access our election night results on November 7, 2016.” Kentucky responded the same IP address “did touch the KY (online voter registration) system on one occasion, 11/1/16.”

In a letter this week, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson told Kemp the department sourced the mid-November activity in Georgia to a federal contractor conducting what he called “normal” internet searches on the Secretary of State’s website. But Kemp says there’s a problem with that answer.

“We haven’t been able to recreate this the way they explained it to us,” Kemp said.

Kemp also told Diamant that DHS has yet to explain at least nine other suspected network scans linked to DHS IP addresses over the last year on or around important primary and presidential election dates. Kemp’s call for answers is amplified now by the National Association of Secretaries of State, or NASS. – WSBTV

The Soldier Accused of Leaking Military Cables to WikiLeaks Is in Court Right Now « Above the Law: A Legal Web Site – News, Commentary, and Opinions on Law Firms, Lawyers, Law School, Law Suits, Judges and Courts


19 Dec 2011 at 5:09 PM

The Soldier Accused of Leaking Military Cables to WikiLeaks Is in Court Right Now

By Christopher Danzig

The former military intelligence analyst accused of leaking hundreds of thousands of documents to WikiLeaks has spent the last four days in a Maryland military court, undergoing a hearing to determine whether or not his case will proceed to court-martial.

For those new to the party, 24-year-old Bradley Manning is accused of committing the biggest security breach in American history. He has been in detainment for the last 19 months, and he faces a multitude of military charges.

The Article 32 hearings, which began on Friday, are something akin to grand jury proceedings in civilian court. At the end, Investigating Officer Colonel Paul Almanza, an Army Reserve officer and Justice Department prosecutor, will decide recommend whether Manning’s case will proceed to court-martial.

So far, the hearings have been interesting to say the least. Let’s see what’s going on….

Kim Zetter at Wired’s Threat Level is blogging extensively about the hearings (and tweeting some color commentary from court):

Manning, who turned 24 Saturday, is charged with 22 violations of military law and faces possible life imprisonment. Manning, who at the time was an Army intelligence analyst, is accused of abusing his access to classified computer systems to leak diplomatic cables, Iraq and Afghanistan action reports and the so-called Collateral Murder video to WikiLeaks. In chat logs published by Wired, Manning allegedly told Lamo that he leaked the documents as an act of political protest against a corrupt system and the he snuck files out of a shared workroom using rewritable CDs labeled with pop stars names, such as Lady Gaga.

One of the bigger revelations from the hearings is that the government produced chat logs from Manning’s own computer, where the soldier allegedly discussed leaking the cables. The messages had previously been made public, but Julian Assange and other Manning supporters claimed the chat messages could have been fabricated. Because the government found the logs on Manning’s own computer, forgery seems less likely.

The hearings have been understandably tense. Manning has a lot of supporters in the technology community. Although he has spent the last year and a half in custody, many say he is a whistleblower, not a traitor.

Back in April, more than 250 legal scholars signed a letter protesting the way the Justice Department was treating Manning. In the letter, signatories including Harvard Law professor Laurence Tribe protested Manning’s “degrading and inhumane conditions.” The letter called the military’s conduct illegal and unconstitutional.

On Friday, the hearing started with a bang when defense attorneys accused Investigating Officer Colonel Almanza (the equivalent of a judge in the case) of bias, because of his work as a Justice Department prosecutor. The defense unsuccessfully asked Almanza to recuse himself. (Hmm, I wonder where we’ve seen that before?)

Earlier today, retired lieutenant and prominent Don’t Ask Don’t Tell activist Dan Choi told Politico he was wrestled to the ground and handcuffed while trying to attend the hearing.

Zetter reported another dramatic moment on Sunday, which reads like something out of A Few Good Men:

Proceedings in the court this morning continued in a contentious manner between defense attorney Coombs and the proceeding’s equivalent of a judge, Investigating Officer Capt. Paul Almanza. At one point, when the IO tried to stop a line of questioning with a witness, questioning the relevancy. Coombs abruptly walked to the defense table and grabbed a book containing Article 32 procedural rules and brandished it to Almanza.

“I would caution the investigating officer as to case law,” he said, adding that the defense should be given wide latitude in questioning to obtain evidence.

“The IO should not arbitrarily limit cross-examination, ” he said. “I am not going off into the ozone layer about this. . . I should be allowed to ask questions about what this witness saw so I can have this testimony under oath as part of discovery.”

Zetter reports that the defense is trying to show that the Army should have responded better to behavioral problems Manning exhibited early in his enlistment. He should have never been deployed, or he should have lost his security clearance earlier, “both of which would have made it impossible for him to obtain the documents he allegedly leaked to WikiLeaks.”

So which is it? Traitor or courageous hero? Should the government put him in jail and throw away the key, or throw him a parade?

Army Arrested Manning Based on Unconfirmed Chat Logs [Threat Level / Wired]
DADT activist Dan Choi barred from Bradley Manning hearing [Politico]
Request for Recusal Denied in Case Against Manning [Associated Press]


Christopher Danzig is a writer in Oakland, California. He covers legal technology and the West Coast for Above the Law. Follow Chris on Twitter @chrisdanzig or email him at cdanziggmail.com. You can read more of his work at chrisdanzig.com.

The Soldier Accused of Leaking Military Cables to WikiLeaks Is in Court Right Now « Above the Law: A Legal Web Site – News, Commentary, and Opinions on Law Firms, Lawyers, Law School, Law Suits, Judges and Courts