The Whole Country is Running Amok!



You know that just thinking bad things about Obama landed people in jail, and I don’t know anyone who liked or voted for him. In fact, he should be in jail for numerous items he did.


Trump on the other hand I voted for and like, and know many, that if they did not like him in the beginning, saw he was not full of shit, and came his way.

Yet, people are always threatening, and in fact, trying to kill Trump, and even saying it publicly does not cause them to land in jail.

Personally, the likes of Madonna saying that she had been thinking “a lot lately about blowing up the white house”, the bitch should have been locked up.

Maxine Waters and Nancy Pelosi should be there with the bitch, and Clinton should have been there back before the elections.

Since when, do people trying to get people to murder anyone not go to jail?  Dumb question, how many are on the Clinton’s list of dead bodies?


Especially when it is the US President they are trying to get murdered?

Same thing with riots? 

Since when does attempting to incite riots not an arrest-able offense?

The whole country is running amok with would be communists, at one time people like that were taken care of one way or another.

Yet, today, we have fewer rights than we have ever had.

We have a news media that all of them should be fired and put on public display handcuffed and shackled. Can’t believe a word out of their mouths.

We have alternative news sites being yanked off the internet, and social media idiots going from one side to other, scared they are going to lose their riches.

Then there are these ANTIFA screwballs.

They hide who they are, go out and commit crimes, and the cops stand there with their sticks in their hands jerking off.

Hell, I remember the riots of the 60s when the cops came, they told you to leave.

If the kids did not leave they would go to clubbing the whole lot of them.
Sometimes, they were shot at. They did not care race or gender, they would bat you down.

Then there are these idiots that are trying to tell kids that there are many different genders, and if they want to be a different sex, that is ok.

If they want to be an animal that’s ok too. They are teaching kids about sex in school, and that transgender men can go to the same bathroom as our little girls.

WTF is wrong with this picture?

And since when do our kids not belong to us, and they do belong to the whole community? I guess that was about the same time, that the vaccines started giving the kids autism.

Is the whole community stepping in to help pay for these kids riddled with autism? Hell no.


The courts will rule against all known law, and in fact make up some laws as they go along.

Foreclosure hell awakened judges making laws. Seen it in a bunch of different states.

And just try going into the court as pro se. What a fucking joke.

No matter how well versed a person is in the law. No matter how well a person follows the rules to a “t”, no matter if the persona has a cut and dry case in their favor, if they don’t have an attorney, they might as well go jerk off in the bushes, because that is about how much it is going to matter.


And that’s not even mentioning the child sex rings stealing, selling, and killing children in this country.

I am so sick of the shit that I could go on, and on, and on…

I guess all I can say is damn, the whole country is running amok.

FORECLOSURE HELL


I had been doing so much better about keeping up with my blogs, until about this last week. I had not gotten back to posting as much as I had in the past, but was doing much better.

I have to admit though, every month, beginning the week before foreclosure hell (the day they auction the homes foreclosed upon), have been particularly hellish.

I guess for a while, no one I know was being foreclosed upon. But beginning last month, my friends began being sold at auction again. It had been a whole year until just these last couple of months. Then all of the sudden, properties that the banks had lost interest in, out of the blue, and with little or no warning, were sold at auction.

We all managed to stop two of the sales, those two were cancelled, but last month, one was lost to foreclosure, and it took a lot of work to get cancelled, the two that were cancelled.

So, even though there may not be the number of foreclosures every month that there had been for a long time, looks like the banks have managed to get lined up, these companies, that will purchase damn near any house at auction. These companies that want to turn around and rent you your house they just purchased at foreclosure.

I told everyone, back in 2008-2009 when Goldman Sachs’ sorry ass said that “only the rich should own houses, everyone else should be renters”, that this is what could be expected. Yes, it took another 8 years for it to happen to this scale, but it is here, and it won’t be going away, till they get every one of our homes.

I have watched foreclosure sales every month since around 2006, and all the properties that were fought for, and the banks, just kind of fizzled away without a lot of fuss, homes that they realized would be close to impossible to get the foreclosed upon owner to leave, now that they can work it out to where these rent home companies, are the ones that has to get rid of the previous owners of the properties.

The banks see this as minor housekeeping, which they don’t mind at all.

When I read this article, I kept hearing that song “Take It To The Limit One More Time”! They’ve changed the words “Sub-Prime” to “Non-Prime” and we re going to take it to the limit one more time…


Subprime mortgages make a comeback—with a new name and soaring demand
The subprime mortgage industry vanished after the Great Recession but is now being reinvented as the nonprime market.
Carrington Mortgage is now offering mortgages to borrowers with “less-than-perfect credit.”
Demand from both borrowers and investors is exceeding expectations.
Diana Olick | @DianaOlick
Published 10:45 AM ET Thu, 12 April 2018 Updated 1:54 PM ET Thu, 12 April 2018
CNBC.com
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/12/sub-prime-mortgages-morph-into-non-prime-loans-and-demand-soars.html
Subprime stages comeback as ‘non-prime’ loans Subprime stages comeback as ‘non-prime’ loans
1:41 PM ET Thu, 12 April 2018 | 01:28

They were blamed for the biggest financial disaster in a century. Subprime mortgages – home loans to borrowers with sketchy credit who put little to no skin in the game. Following the epic housing crash, they disappeared, due to strong, new regulation, and zero demand from investors who were badly burned. Barely a decade later, they’re coming back with a new name — nonprime — and, so far, some new standards.

California-based Carrington Mortgage Services, a midsized lender, just announced an expansion into the space, offering loans to borrowers, “with less-than-perfect credit.” Carrington will originate and service the loans, but it will also securitize them for sale to investors.

“We believe there is actually a market today in the secondary market for people who want to buy nonprime loans that have been properly underwritten,” said Rick Sharga, executive vice president of Carrington Mortgage Holdings. “We’re not going back to the bad old days of ninja lending, when people with no jobs, no income, and no assets were getting loans.”

A home improvement contractor works on a house in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Here’s how much homeowners could cash out in home equity
2:32 PM ET Mon, 2 April 2018 | 01:14
All loans will not be the same


Sharga said Carrington will manually underwrite each loan, assessing the individual risks. But it will allow its borrowers to have FICO credit scores as low as 500. The current average for agency-backed mortgages is in the mid-700s. Borrowers can take out loans of up to $1.5 million on single-family homes, townhomes and condominiums. They can also do cash-out refinances, where borrowers tap extra equity in their homes, up to $500,000. Recent credit events, like a foreclosure, bankruptcy or a history of late payments are acceptable.

All loans, however, will not be the same for all borrowers. If a borrower is higher risk, a higher down payment will be required, and the interest rate will likely be higher.

“What we’re talking about is underwriting that goes back to common sense sort of practices. If you have risk, you offset risk somewhere else,” added Sharga, while touting, “We probably are going to have the widest range of products for people with challenging credit in the marketplace.”

Carrington is not alone in the space. Angel Oak began offering and securitizing nonprime mortgages two years ago and has done six nonprime securitizations so far. It recently finalized its biggest securitization yet — $329 million, comprising 905 mortgages with an average amount of about $363,000. Just more than 80 percent of the loans are nonprime.

A ‘who’s who of Wall Street’
Investors in Angel Oak’s nonprime securitizations are, “a who’s who of Wall Street,” according to company representatives, citing hedge funds and insurance companies. Angel Oak’s securitizations now total $1.3 billion in mortgage debt.

Angel Oak, along with Caliber Home Loans, have been the main players in the space, securitizing relatively few loans. That is clearly about to change in a big way, as demand is rising.

“We believe that more competition is positive for the marketplace because there is strong enough demand for the product to support multiple originators,” said Lauren Hedvat, managing director, capital markets at Angel Oak. “Additionally, the more competitors there are, the wider the footprint becomes, which should open the door for more potential borrowers.”

Big banks are also getting in the game, both investing in the securities and funding the lenders, according to Sharga.

“It’s large financial institutions. A lot of people with private capital sitting on the sidelines, who are very interested in this market and believe that as long as the risks are managed well, and companies like ours are particularly good at managing credit risk, that it’s a good investment opportunity,” he said.

As the economy improves, and rents continue to rise, more Americans are trying to become homeowners, but the scars of the Great Recession still stand in the way. One-fifth of consumers today still have very low credit scores, often disqualifying them from obtaining a mortgage in today’s tight lending market.

Relaxed lending standards
Last summer, Fannie Mae announced it would relax its lending standards for prime loans, allowing borrowers with higher debt and lower credit scores to obtain loans without additional risk overlays, such as large down payments and a year’s worth of cash reserves.

Fannie Mae raised its debt-to-income (DTI) limit from 45 percent to 50 percent. DTI is the amount of total debt a borrower can have compared to his or her income. As a result, demand from buyers with higher debt exceeded all expectations. The share of high DTI loans jumped from 6 percent in January 2017 to nearly 20 percent by the end of February 2018, according to a study by the Urban Institute.

“From January to July 2017, Fannie purchased 80,467 loans with DTI ratios between 45 and 50 percent. But from August 2017 to February 2018, Fannie purchased 181,911 loans in the same DTI bucket. This increase of more than 100,000 loans in just seven months exceeded our estimate (85,000 additional Fannie loans annually) and Fannie’s expectations.” – Urban Institute

The mortgage industry expectation was that Fannie Mae would mitigate the additional risk with other factors, like a higher necessary credit score, but that was not added. The mortgage insurers balked, since they would be on the hook for the risk, so last month Fannie Mae “recalibrated” its risk assessment criteria again.

“We got a bigger response than we thought we were going to, so we dialed back to make sure we were in the right spot where our governance kicks in to make sure we’re not taking excessive risk,” said Doug Duncan, Fannie Mae’s chief economist.

Millennials carry more debt
The outsized demand from borrowers with more debt as well as demand for nonprime mortgages in the private sector show just how many borrowers today would like to become homeowners but are frozen out of the mortgage market.

Millennials, the largest homebuying cohort today, have much higher levels of student debt than previous generations. Members of older generations who went through foreclosures during the housing crisis or other hits to their credit are still struggling with lower FICO scores.

In addition, credit tightened up dramatically. In fact, between 2009 and 2015, tighter credit accounted for just more than 6 million “missing” loans, according to research by Laurie Goodman at the Urban Institute. These are mortgages that would have been granted under more normal historical underwriting standards.

The rebirth of the nonprime market is focused on these missing mortgages. The hope is that the industry will also focus on better standards of underwriting and not take risk to the levels it once did, levels that resulted in disaster.

From Ring of Fire: Greece Goes To War With the World’s Most Corrupt Banks; Scams Will Be Revealed


greekfinmin11
Greece Goes To War With the World’s Most Corrupt Banks; Scams Will Be Revealed
— February 20, 2015
http://www.ringoffireradio.com/2015/02/greece-goes-to-war-with-the-worlds-most-corrupt-banks-scams-will-be-revealed/


Ever since the left-wing, anti-austerity Syriza party in Greece took control of the country, Greek leaders have been putting up a fight for its economy, reported Democracy Now. Greek financial leaders will continue trying to get their country out of the eurozone in order to keep their economy from completely bottoming-out.

Greece’s problems really didn’t go full tilt until Wall Street banks got involved. One of the main culprits is Goldman Sachs, which enabled Greece to hide their debts. The bank charged them $300 million for the operation, a veritable payday for the massive bank. This transaction goes all the way back to 2001, the year that Greece became part of Europe’s monetary union.

The New York Times reported in 2010 that “Wall Street tactics akin to the ones that fostered subprime mortgages in America have worsened the financial crisis shaking Greece.” Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, and many others contributed to the growing Greek debt crisis.

Their tactic? Take advantage of an entity while its down and use the desperation of another country to line Wall Street’s pockets. The banks took interest into a high risk client, and, driven by greed, they intensified an already existing problem. Did the banks care? No. They just cared about what’s profitable.

“Politicians want to pass the ball forward, and if a banker can show them a way to pass a problem to the future, they will fall for it,” said economist Gikas Hardouvelis.

The banks worsened the problem so much that the European Union called for an investigation into Goldman Sachs and the other banks involved.

“It appears that Goldman Sachs have colluded with past Greek governments to reduce the appearance of Greece’s debt for short-term gain, while in reality making it worse than ever,” said Arlene McCarthy, vice-president of the European parliament’s economic and monetary affairs committee. “These deals have increased costs for Greek taxpayers and left a mess behind for Greece’s citizens and the eurozone.”

Today, this problem has compounded over the years and with the threat of austerity, Greece has been backed into a corner.

When Greek financial minister, Yaris Varoufakis, introduced a compromise proposal to German finance minister, Wolfgang Schauble, the proposal was swiftly rejected. A union of 19 eurozone finance ministers will meet again today in Brussels in an attempt “to resolve a standoff that has sent jitters across the continent at the prospect of a messy Greek exit from the single currency.”

Greek’s €240 billion bailout expires in exactly one week. However, austerity measures attached to the bailout are making it difficult for the country to break out and abandon the euro. Because Greece is “locked out” of international lending markets, the country could go completely broke next month if no deal is reached, reported The Guardian.

“We are working so that Greece stays in the eurozone,” said Germany’s commissioner to the European Union, Guenther Oettinger. “On this basis I think an agreement will still be possible in the next eight days – if necessary via a further meeting of government leaders.”

Austerity measures and past deals with banks have Greece in the pressure cooker. If no deal is reached, Greece’s economy will tank, only accentuating the actions of Wall Street banks that sent the Greek economy from a stall into an outright tailspin.