How Would CDC Know That 3.2 million Americans Have Hepatitis C, That Were Born Between 1945 and 1965? Unless They Gave It To Them…


Email Received from CDC:

Viral Hepatitis Updates from CDC

CDC Releases New Phase of the Know More Hepatitis Campaign
Of the estimated 3.2 million Americans who have Hepatitis C, 3 in 4 are people born from 1945 to 1965. The Know More Hepatitis campaign encourages everyone born from 1945-1965 to follow the CDC recommendation to get tested for Hepatitis C.

The campaign is being implemented using a variety of multi-media channels including print, radio and TV PSAs, as well as airport dioramas, billboards, and transit advertisements. CDC developed additional campaign materials to help educate patients and promote testing for Hepatitis C including a new video PSA “Hepatitis C: A Hidden Disease”which shows that even if you have a healthy life and no symptoms, you could still have Hepatitis C.

Implementing the Viral Hepatitis Action Plan: The Role of Community Leadership
Since the release of the 2014 Action Plan for the Prevention, Care, & Treatment of Viral Hepatitis, groups like Hep B United (HBU) have used it as a framework to help guide their work. HBU utilized the Stakeholders’ Workbook as a starting point to develop a Strategic Plan which highlights HBU members’ areas of focus: community and provider education, improving testing and linkage to care to prevent hepatitis B-related liver disease and cancer, eliminating perinatal transmission of hepatitis B, and strengthening hepatitis B and C surveillance efforts. HBU also developed Opportunities for Federal-Community Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hepatitis B: 2014-2016 which highlights ways in which HBU members can collaborate in larger federal inter-agency efforts. https://blog.aids.gov/2015/01/implementing-the-viral-hepatitis-action-plan-the-role-of-community-leadership.html

NIH Announces Funding for New Technologies for Viral Hepatitis
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has issued a funding opportunity announcement (FOA). A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant entitled New Technologies for Viral Hepatitis SBIR (R43/R44) encourages small businesses to address viral hepatitis research opportunities delineated in the Action Plan including (but not limited to) the development of: rapid screening tests, new diagnostic tests, tests for viral hepatitis-related complications, practical models of care, new and improved therapies to treat viral hepatitis or manage complications of disease or antiviral treatment, genetic-based tests for patient management or treatment selection, preventive vaccines, innovative approaches to pathogen identification and reduction in blood products. https://blog.aids.gov/2015/01/nih-announces-funding-for-new-technologies-for-viral-hepatitis.html

Advertisements

Feel free to comment

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s