1068 Americans Killed By Police In 2014 Why Do 2 Deaths Get More Attention Than 1068 Are We All Created Equal


Nevada State Personnel WATCH

getting back to the point 1068 americans killed by police

Are we all created equal in America? Is this the land of the free? Even if you’re a police officer you need to ask yourself this question as the day will come when that same system could turn on you.

Recently the number of people killed by police has risen to 1068. That number is constantly rising and rarely do any of those deaths get the publicity and acknowledgement by President Obama. Yet every one of those victims has family, pain and loss. So why is it that some deaths are made more important than others?

It’s interesting that police are in fact to blame for the 1068 deaths. Police can commit crimes of murder and they do yet rarely are they prosecuted or held personally liable for their actions. Whether you agree or not these are 1068 deaths that happened via Police interaction.

The numbers and crimes by police…

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WARNING!!! Just In From AlertsUSA: State of Georgia, “A lab technician with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may have been exposed to the Ebola virus in an agency laboratory in Atlanta earlier this week”


RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL

2014-12-25 04:35:41 – Biological Hazard – USA

!!! WARNING !!!

EDIS Code: BH-20141225-46439-USA
Date&Time: 2014-12-25 04:35:41 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Georgia,
Location: CDC,
City: Atlanta

Description:
A lab technician with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may have been exposed to the Ebola virus in an agency laboratory in Atlanta earlier this week. And up to a dozen other lab workers are being checked for possible exposure, CDC officials said late Wednesday afternoon.

The possible exposure occurred Monday when CDC scientists doing research on Ebola mistakenly transferred a sample of the potentially lethal virus to another CDC lab in the same building, the Washington Post reported. The sample, on a sealed plate, should not have been moved to the second, less secure laboratory, the CDC said in a statement. There is no risk to the public because the sample never left the building, CDC officials said.

The technician who handled the material has no symptoms of Ebola infection and will be monitored for 21 days, the incubation period for the disease. The other employees who entered the lab will be checked for possible exposure. So far, none of them seems to have been exposed to the virus, the agency said. “I am troubled by this incident in our Ebola research laboratory in Atlanta,” CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in the statement. “We are monitoring the health of one technician who could possibly have been exposed and I have directed that there be a full review of every aspect of the incident and that CDC take all necessary measures.”

The error was discovered by laboratory scientists on Tuesday. The lab area had already been decontaminated and the sample material destroyed — as part of routine procedure — before the mistake was discovered. The lab was decontaminated for a second time and is now closed. The Ebola virus has been rampant in West Africa since the spring, with nearly 20,000 infections and almost 7,600 deaths, according to the World Health Organization.

This week’s incident is the latest in a string of handling mishaps by the CDC. Following a highly publicized incident last summer, federal health officials concluded that it was highly unlikely that any CDC lab workers in Atlanta were exposed to live anthrax during a safety mix-up. Initial reports had indicated that one of the CDC’s high-level biosafety labs was preparing anthrax samples for research in lower-level labs. The high-level lab did not adequately inactivate the samples before sending them to the other labs, which aren’t equipped to handle live anthrax samples. Workers at the lower-level labs, believing the samples were inactivated, weren’t wearing proper protective equipment while handling them, the agency said at the time.

The CDC is considered one of the world’s leading public health agencies. But, according to USA Today, agency labs have been repeatedly cited in private government audits for failing to properly secure bioterror agents, according to restricted government watchdog reports obtained by the newspaper earlier this year. CDC labs house some of the most deadly germs in the world, including Ebola, SARS, monkeypox and dangerous flu strains.

The name of Hazard: Ebola Exposure
Species: Human
Status: Suspected

Posted:2014-12-25 04:35:41 [UTC]

Countrywide Whistle-Blower to Get $57 Million


Countrywide Whistle-Blower to Get $57 Million
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Thursday, December 18, 2014 – 17:06
Phil Hall

http://nationalmortgageprofessional.com/news/52111/countrywide-whistle-blower-get-57-million?utm_source=MadMimi&utm_medium=email&utm_content=NMP+Daily%3A+Countrywide+Whistle-Blower+to+Get+%2457+Million+and+More+___&utm_campaign=20141218_m123650073_NMP+Daily%3A+Mortgage+Delinquency+Rates+Continue+to+Shrink+and+More+___+4&utm_term=Countrywide+Whistle-Blower+to+Get+_2457+Million

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A former executive at Countrywide Financial Corporation is going to receive $57 million for his role in a whistle-blower lawsuit against Bank of America Corporation that resulted in the lender settling federal mortgage fraud charges for approximately $16.7 billion, the largest financial settlement in U.S. judicial history.

According to a Bloomberg News report, Edward O’Donnell, a former Countrywide executive vice president, filed a lawsuit against the Charlotte, N.C.-headquartered bank in August in which he accused Countrywide of selling mortgages with inadequate underwriting under the aegis of its “High Speed Swim Lane” program to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Bank of America acquired Countrywide in 2008.

O’Donnell’s payout is a based on the False Claims Act, which enables whistle-blowers to claim 15 percent to 25 percent of what the federal government recovers in its successful prosecutions or out-of-court settlements.

Separate from the O’Donnell case, Bank of America’s legal problems continued yesterday when the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), the federal regulator for the credit union industry, filed suit in federal court against the lender and U.S. Bank National Association, alleging that they violated state and federal laws by not fulfilling their trustee duties for 99 residential mortgage-backed securities trusts. The NCUA charged that five corporate credit unions-U.S. Central, WesCorp, Members United, Southwest and Constitution-purchased approximately $5.8 billion in residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) issued from the trusts between 2004 and 2007, but these securities lost their value and contributed to the failure of all five credit unions.