It You Work For Chase, They Bet Your Life Away


JPMorgan Chase Bets $10.4 Billion on the Early Death of Workers

Monday, March 24, 2014 11:07

(Before It’s News)

Families of young JPMorgan Chase workers who have experienced tragic deaths over the past four months, have been kept in the dark on many details, including the fact that the bank most likely held a life insurance policy on their loved one – payable to itself. Banks in the U.S., as well as other corporations, are allowed to make multi-billion dollar wagers that their profits from life insurance policies on employees will outstrip the cost of paying premiums and other fees. Early deaths help those wagers pay off.

According to the December 31, 2013 financial filing known as the Call Report that JPMorgan made with Federal regulators, it has tied up $10.4 billion in illiquid, long term bets on the death of a large segment of its employees.

The program is known among regulators as Bank Owned Life Insurance or BOLI. Federal regulators specifically exempted BOLI in passing the final version of the Volcker Rule in December of last year which disallowed most proprietary trading or betting for the house. Regulators stated in the rule that “Rather, these accounts permit the banking entity to effectively hedge and cover costs of providing benefits to employees through insurance policies related to key employees.” We have italicized the word “key” because regulators know very well from financial filings that the country’s mega banks are not just insuring key employees but a broad-base of their employees.

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Source: http://rinf.com/alt-news/breaking-news/jpmorgan-chase-bets-10-4-billion-early-death-workers/

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One thought on “It You Work For Chase, They Bet Your Life Away

  1. Pingback: Chase Bets Lives! | FOREVER VICTIMS

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