Nuclear waste “piling up at bottom” — Lava-like material has spread all over… “hanging like icicles” — Mystery orange substance seen


Expert: Melted fuel found at Fukushima — Corium up to 6 feet thick below reactor — Nuclear waste “piling up at bottom” — Lava-like material has spread all over… “hanging like icicles” — Mystery orange substance seen (VIDEO)

 
Published: July 24th, 2017 at 3:52 pm ET
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Kyodo, Jul 22, 2017 (emphasis added): In big step forward, Tepco finds melted fuel at bottom of reactor 3 in Fukushima… The debris was clearly identifiable to at least one nuclear expert. “The images that appear to be melted fuel debris match those found in the (1986) Chernobyl crisis,” said Tadashi Narabayashi, a specially appointed professor of nuclear engineering working at Hokkaido University. “It’s definitely fuel debris… It’s an epoch-making event.”

New York Daily News, Jul 22, 2017: Underwater robot captures images of melted fuel at wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant — An underwater robot captured photos of 3-foot thick lumps of melted nuclear fuel covering the floor

Sky News, Jul 24, 2017: Melted nuclear fuel spotted in Fukushima reactor — The radioactive material has been spotted and pictured by a submersible robot…

CNN, Jul 24, 2017: [The robot] has revealed appears to be stalactites of melted nuclear fuel, [Tepco] said… the robot sent back 16 hours worth of images of massive, lava-like fuel deposits

AP, Jul 23, 2017: [Images] showed massive deposits believed to be melted nuclear fuel covering the floor

Asahi Shimbun, Jul 23, 2017: Melted nuke fuel images show struggle facing Fukushima plant — Images captured on July 22 of solidified nuclear fuel debris at the bottom of a containment vessel of the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant show the enormity of decommissioning of the facility… [TEPCO] also discovered that the nuclear fuel debris has spread throughout the containment vessel.

AP, Jul 22, 2017: [TEPCO] said the robot found large amounts of lava-like debris apparently containing fuel that had flowed out of the core… TEPCO spokesman Takahiro Kimoto said it was the first time a robot camera has captured what is believed to be the melted fuel. “That debris has apparently fallen from somewhere higher above. We believe it is highly likely to be melted fuel or something mixed with it,” Kimoto said…

Kyodo, Jul 23, 2017: The robot was sent closer to the bottom of the reactor on Saturday and found possible fuel debris scattered in a wide area.

Japan Times, Jul 21, 2017: Fukushima robot finds potential fuel debris hanging like icicles in reactor 3… The objects spotted this time look like icicles… Tepco is pinning its efforts on technology not yet invented to get the melted fuel out of the reactors.

Reuters, Jul 21, 2017: Tepco detected black-colored material that dangled like icicles that could be nuclear debris near the bottom of the reactor’s pressure vessel that contained the fuel rods, the report said, citing unnamed sources.

Bloomberg, Jul 21, 2017: New images show what is likely to be melted nuclear fuel hanging from inside one of Japan’s wrecked Fukushima reactors… [Tepco] released images on Friday showing a hardened black, grey and orange substance

Financial Times, Jul 24, 2017: [Kimoto] was reluctant to speculate on the nature of seemingly corroded orange patches in the images.

NHK, Jul 23, 2017: [TEPCO] says Saturday’s probe found lumps that are highly likely to be fuel debris piling up at the bottom of the containment vessel… The deposits are estimated to be one to two meters thick. Images released on Saturday show black, rock-like lumps and what appear to be pebbles and sand accumulating at the bottom.

Thoughts…



In Congress, July 4, 1776.
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.–

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Section 2
1: The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States,
Section 8
1: The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
15: To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;

Bill of Rights
Article the fourth… A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Article the sixth… The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Shadow Government: WikiLeaks Exposes George Soros Controlling Clinton — Nwo Report


Arlin Report

A new discovery from the WikiLeaks DNC email cache exposes George Soros issuing orders to Hillary Clinton while she was Secretary of State, and a follow up investigation reveals that Clinton carried out his instructions to the letter. During the last 214 years, past Presidents and political leaders have tried to warn the public that […]

via Shadow Government: WikiLeaks Exposes George Soros Controlling Clinton — Nwo Report

She is getting exposed daily……for her past while Secretary of State and everything is coming out dirty, corrupt, illegal and treasonous; let alone twenty to thirty years previous.

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TransUnion headed to trial over government watch list alerts


5/12/17 REUTERS LEGAL 21:04:10
REUTERS LEGAL
Copyright (c) 2017 Thomson Reuters
https://1.next.westlaw.com/Document/I2a42a570375811e78b72d2bf6c8db419/View/FullText.html?transitionType=CategoryPageItem&contextData=(sc.Default)
May 12, 2017

TransUnion headed to trial over government watch list alerts
Dena Aubin
(Reuters) – Credit bureau TransUnion will try to convince a jury next month that it took reasonable steps to check the accuracy of its reports as it defends itself against accusations that it wrongly tagged consumers as being on a federal list of security threats.
In a trial brief filed on Thursday in San Francisco federal court, lawyers for TransUnion said plaintiffs suing the credit bureau have no evidence that it violated anyone’s rights or acted recklessly.
Filed in 2012, the class action accuses TransUnion of wrongly reporting that consumers were on a list of terrorists, drug traffickers and other security threats maintained by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).
Companies and individuals are prohibited by OFAC rules from doing business with anyone on the list, with steep penalties for violations, and TransUnion provides OFAC alerts to lenders as a service to help them comply.
The lawsuit said many consumers were wrongly tagged as being on the blacklist because TransUnion reported an OFAC red flag when a name partially matched a name on the government’s list.
A spokesman for TransUnion and lawyers for the plaintiffs could not immediately be reached for comment. Trial is set for June 12 in the case, brought on behalf of thousands of consumers nationwide.
The case is believed to be the first major class action to go to trial against a credit bureau over OFAC alerts. The other two major credit bureaus, Experian and Equifax, also offer OFAC screening for their customers, although they have not faced class actions over their practices.
The named plaintiff in the TransUnion lawsuit, Sergio Ramirez of Fremont, California, said he was denied an auto loan in 2011 after the dealer ordered a credit report from TransUnion and saw a notation that he may be on the government’s blacklist.
When Ramirez contacted TransUnion and asked for a copy of his credit report, the OFAC alert was not on it, his lawsuit said.
Plaintiffs accused TransUnion of violating the U.S. Fair Credit Reporting Act, which requires credit bureaus to take reasonable steps to assure their reports are accurate.
TransUnion also violated the act by not including OFAC alerts in copies of reports requested by consumers, plaintiffs alleged. Plaintiffs seek punitive damages to be determined at trial.
In its trial brief, TransUnion said in 2011, when the alleged conduct occurred, the company knew of no technology that could have achieved greater accuracy than the screening process it used.
TransUnion’s OFAC alerts also stated that the individual was only a potential match to the government’s list, alerting users that further review was needed, the credit bureau’s lawyers said.
In their own brief, lawyers for Ramirez said TransUnion’s procedures were inadequate because they screened only for a first and last name, or an approximation of those names, and did not check any other identifying information.
When a consumer requested a copy of his credit report, TransUnion sent information about the OFAC alert in a separate letter, saying it was being provided as a courtesy. At best that created an ambiguity about whether that information was in the consumer’s report, plaintiffs said.
The case is Sergio Ramirez v. TransUnion, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 12-0632.
For the plaintiffs: Andrew Ogilvie at Anderson Ogilvie & Brewer and James Francis and John Soumilas at Francis & Mailman
For the defendant: Julia Strickland and Stephen Newman at Stroock Stroock & Lavan and Bruce Luckman at Sherman Silverstein Kohl Rose & Podolsky
—- Index References —-
Company: EQUIFAX INC; EXPERIAN PLC; TRANSUNION
News Subject: (Business Lawsuits & Settlements (1BU19); Class Actions (1CL03); Consumer Protection (1CO43); Judicial Cases & Rulings (1JU36); Legal (1LE33); Liability (1LI55))
Industry: (Banking (1BA20); Credit (1CR60); Financial Services (1FI37); Retail Banking Services (1RE38))
Region: (Americas (1AM92); California (1CA98); North America (1NO39); U.S. West Region (1WE46); USA (1US73))
Language: EN
Other Indexing: (John Soumilas; Bruce Luckman; Julia Strickland; James Francis; Stephen Newman; Andrew Ogilvie; Sergio Ramirez)
Keywords: banking; fedlit (MCC:OVR); (MCCL:OVR); (N2:USA); (N2:AMERS); (N2:NAMER); (N2:US)

Alan Judd/AJC: State still sending mentally ill people to homeless shelters


State still sending mentally ill people to homeless shelters

By ALAN JUDD The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 3 hrs ago
http://www.mdjonline.com/neighbor_newspapers/news/state/state-still-sending-mentally-ill-people-to-homeless-shelters/article_b4537c5d-8212-5a63-bc39-e2766efb57c0.html#tncms-source=infinity-scroll-summary-siderail-latest

ATLANTA (AP) — Mentally ill patients often left Georgia’s state psychiatric hospitals with just a bus token and directions to a homeless shelter.

For people with disabilities, these same institutions became places of permanent confinement.

This is the system that Georgia, under pressure from the federal government, pledged seven years ago to radically overhaul. But with a court-enforced deadline fast approaching, the state increasingly seems unlikely to fulfill its promises.

Georgia has less than 14 months – until June 30, 2018 – to comply with a settlement it reached with the U.S. Department of Justice in 2010. The agreement followed an investigation that concluded the state had systematically violated the rights of people with mental illness and developmental disabilities.

But the state continues to discharge patients with mental illness to places where they are unlikely to get psychiatric treatment: extended-stay motels, for instance, and even the massive Peachtree-Pine homeless shelter in midtown Atlanta. All patients with disabilities are supposed to be moved into group homes or other community-based facilities, but at the current rate of progress, the state might not meet that requirement for another 10 years.

As officials try to comply with the agreement, they also are investigating an alarming number of deaths in community-based treatment: about 350 since 2014. Those apparently include five dozen suicides.

A court-appointed monitor credits the state with making many promised improvements, especially regarding crisis intervention and other services for people with mental illness.

Still, a grim picture emerges from the monitor’s most recent report, as well as from interviews and documents reviewed by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

It is “absolutely essential” that the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disability “act with urgency to meet its obligations,” the monitor, Elizabeth Jones, wrote in late March in a report to U.S. District Judge Charles Pannell. “Although there has been noteworthy progress in certain discrete areas of implementation, the reform efforts require additional diligent and effective actions if compliance is to be achieved within the anticipated timeframe.”

Department officials declined to be interviewed.

In a statement, the agency did not say whether it expects to meet the deadlines next year. But the department said it is moving at “a reasonable pace” to move. “Transitions are carefully and individually planned to meet the unique needs and preferences of each individual and to provide the best opportunities for success in the community.”

The agency said it welcomed the monitor’s “reflections and recommendations.”
Neighbor News Online Updates

The Justice Department began investigating Georgia’s psychiatric hospitals in 2007 after a Journal-Constitution series, “A Hidden Shame,” exposed a pattern of poor medical care, abuse, neglect and bad management that had caused dozens of unnecessary deaths.

Transforming a historically troubled mental health system has been a slower process than perhaps anyone envisioned when state and federal authorities put together a plan. Already, a judge extended the deadline for compliance once, from 2015 to 2018.

The state has spent millions of dollars and reorganized the bureaucracy that oversees the hospitals and community treatment. It also closed two state hospitals, in Rome and Thomasville. All that’s left of Central State Hospital, the notorious facility in Milledgeville that once warehoused as many as 12,000 people, is a unit for people committed through the criminal justice system.

In past years, the state hospitals, especially Georgia Regional Hospital/Atlanta, sent scores of newly discharged patients to locations where continued treatment seemed unlikely: homeless shelters, street corners, even an abandoned van on a street in Atlanta’s West End.

But from 2016 to 2017, according to the monitor’s report, the hospitals cut discharges to homeless shelters by half. At the same time, however, the number of patients placed in extended-stay motels quadrupled.